Reece 3789
Reece 3789 Reece 3789
Teen Wolf 3788
Teen Wolf 3788 Teen Wolf 3788
Pebbles 3785
Pebbles 3785 Pebbles 3785
Bits 3785
Bits 3785 Bits 3785
Tule 3784
Tule 3784 Tule 3784
Honey Bee 3783
Honey Bee 3783 Honey Bee 3783
Roddy 3782
Roddy 3782 Roddy 3782
Sophie 3781
Sophie 3781 Sophie 3781
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Frequently asked questions

Where do Muttville dogs come from?

Many senior dogs end up at shelters. Some come from loving homes where someone has died or has become incapable of caring for an animal. Other dogs have been dumped at shelters with little or no explanation. When this happens the majority do not make it into an adoption program. This is where we come in! We are routinely called on to rescue dogs from euthanasia. We check their health and test their temperaments and match them with new families to make a good fit for both.

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How do you decide which dogs to rescue?

We rescue senior dogs, but there’s no strict rule about when a dog becomes a senior. At conventional shelters, some larger dogs are considered too old for adoption at 8 years old, while for smaller dogs the cutoff may be 10 or 12. Muttville believes that each dog should be assessed individually. Important factors in our rescue decision are temperament and whether the dog is slated for euthanasia. If a dog will benefit from even a month or a week in a loving home, then we will do our best to provide this for him or her.

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How do I adopt a Muttville dog?

The process to adopt a Muttville dog is described on our how to adopt page.

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What does it cost to adopt a Muttville dog?

Muttville charges an adoption fee of $200 for each dog that helps to cover spay/neuter surgery, shots, and other medical and general care given before the dog is made available for adoption. Learn more about the adoption process here.

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Do I need to live in the San Francisco Bay Area to adopt a Muttville dog?

No. Muttville adopts out to loving homes all over California. Read more about the Muttville adoption process here.

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Do I need to have a backyard to adopt a Muttville dog?

No. While a backyard is nice for everyone to have, it’s no substitute for daily exercise. Walking your dog and/or taking it to a dog park are essential to keeping your dog healthy and happy.

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What if I have questions about how to take care of my dog?

Every Muttville dog is dear to our hearts, and our commitment to their well-being never ends. Contact us with any questions you have about your adopted dog, and we’ll be happy to help.

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What if something happens and I can no longer care for my adopted dog?

Please contact us. We will work with you to find a new home for him or her.

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Is my donation to Muttville tax-deductible?

Yes. Muttville is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, so your donations are 100% tax deductible. Our tax ID is 26-0416747.

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Where do my donation dollars go?

Our biggest expense is caring for the dogs we rescue. Every dog receives a complete blood workup to assess his or her health, and it’s not uncommon for a dog to require spay/neuter, tooth extraction, or other procedures. Here are our approximate expenses for any one dog.

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Can I give a donation as a gift?

Absolutely! Giving a gift donation is a simple process. First, provide us with the information about your gift recipient and/or dedication. You can create a custom ecard yourself – fun! – to announce your gift, or fill out our online gift donation form to have us send an annoucement card by postal mail. Either way, when you’re done, you’ll be directed to PayPal to process your payment, where you can use any major credit card. (No PayPal account is needed.)

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I'm uncomfortable donating online. Can I send a check instead?

Of course! Make it payable to Muttvile, and send it to:

Muttville
P.O. Box 410207
San Francisco, CA 94141

(And thanks!)

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I love what you are doing. How can I help?

In addition to donating to Muttville, you can help by becoming a Muttville foster parent or a volunteer.

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